Renee Couture

Sanctuary: an Echo of Frustration
Renee Couture Sanctuary: an Echo of Frustration 3,800+ pinches Bolivian salt, old work gloves
But the Flowers, They Were Ours
2010
3,800+ pinches Bolivian salt, old work gloves
variable

Explores the invisibility of migrant labor.

image credit: Susan Rochester

Renee Couture Sanctuary: an Echo of Frustration glass bottle, collected tears
Sometimes Just Too Damn Much, Sometimes Just Not Enough
2010
glass bottle, collected tears
1.5" x 2.5" x 2.5"

The collection of tears explore having hopes and dreams, the struggles and frustrations associated with reaching those dreams, and the sadness associated with failure.

image credit: Sandee McGee

Renee Couture Sanctuary: an Echo of Frustration mirrors, digital pigment prints on Plexiglas, one month's ash from wood stove and burned paperwork
Work is What I Do
2010
mirrors, digital pigment prints on Plexiglas, one month's ash from wood stove and burned paperwork
12" x 12" x 12"

Examines how one's identity is a multiplicity of roles. Through collecting wood stove ash and ash derived from burned paper work, I attempt to compare work completed at two sites (home and work) that endlessly shape one’s identity, represented by the infinite space created by inwardly-facing mirrors.

image credit: Sandee McGee

Renee Couture Sanctuary: an Echo of Frustration


Renee Couture Sanctuary: an Echo of Frustration


Renee Couture Sanctuary: an Echo of Frustration Pillows cases, ash from wood stove and burnt paperwork, wax, glitter, clear acrylic medium, lace, crochet thread, gouache, and flagging tape
10 Pillows Not to be Laid on Again
2010
Pillows cases, ash from wood stove and burnt paperwork, wax, glitter, clear acrylic medium, lace, crochet thread, gouache, and flagging tape
variable dimensions

Anchored in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire from nearly 100 years ago, this work explores the questions, "what is our (cultural) relationship to work/labor?", and “how has work/labor changed historically?”

image credit: Sandee McGee